psalm 48 meaning

posted in: Uncategorised | 0

This psalm would therefore seem to indicate a close relationship between the faithful servants of the earthly temple and the kings and priests in God’s Kingdom who are of the Israel of God, greatly lessening the supposed discontinuity between physical and spiritual Israel, as well as the Hebrew scriptures and their applicability to Christians today. In addition, Psalm 48 shares some ties with Psalm 84 as a psalm that praises the temple and the spiritual work of God that will go on in a restored and godly religious system [2]. Ps 48:1-3, are in honour of the Lord and the city dedicated to his worship. Please enter your email address associated with your Salem All-Pass account, then click Continue. Mount Zion shall be glad, the daughters of Judah shall exult, because of your judgements. In many ways the thematic concerns of the Sons of Korah are frequently mentioned. A mountain of holiness, for the display of justifying righteousness, of sanctifying grace. That wind, specifically an east wind, signifies nothing else but the dispersion of falses and evils, or, what is the same thing, of evil spirits and genii, and afterwards arrangement into order, may be manifest from the word, as in Isaiah, "You will disperse them, and the wind will take them away, and the storm will dissipate them," Is 41:16; and in David, "Lo! Jerusalem was the peculiar abode of the God of Israel, the seat of the theocratic government, and the centre of prescribed worship, and even thus is the church the place of divine manifestation. A Song and Psalm. Great is the Lord. Psalms 48:1-3 , are in honour of the Lord and the city dedicated to his worship. This understanding of the prophetic meaning (aside from whatever relevance to the physical Jerusalem is meant in the praise of the Sons of Korah) would then add something of importance to the first-person witness statements of the Sons of Korah mentioned. Where his holy temple, his holy priests, and his holy sacrifices might continually be seen. Psalm 48 – The City of the Great King. Like our songs, they address a variety of topics and situations from simply giving praise, being comforted in times of trouble, of the need to have sin forgiven, and hope in times of war. As we have heard, so have we seen. [1] https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2012/05/18/psalm-47-shout-to-god-with-the-voice-of-triumph/, [2] https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2011/05/04/psalm-84-how-lovely-is-your-tabernacle-better-is-one-day/, [3] https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2012/05/09/psalm-46-god-is-our-refuge-and-our-strength/, [4] http://www.hymnary.org/text/glorious_things_of_thee_are_spoken, [5] https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2011/03/12/psalm-87-this-one-was-born-there-glorious-things-of-thee-are-spoken/, [6] http://www.christnotes.org/commentary.php?com=wes&b=19&c=48, Pingback: An Introduction To The Sons of Korah Project | Edge Induced Cohesion, Pingback: An Introduction To The Psalms Commentary Project | Edge Induced Cohesion. These shifting tenses, which apply to humans, work to emphasize God’s continuity. Salem Media Group. It records the withdrawal of certain confederate kings from Jerusalem, their courage failing them before striking a blow. Title. The divisions of the psalm are Psalms 48:1-8, concluded with the word "Selah"; and Psalms 48:9-14. Let Mount Zion rejoice, let the daughters of Judah be glad, because of your judgments. Selah.”. For one, the Jerusalem praised by the Sons of Korah is not the same Jerusalem that exists in Israel. Additionally, the people of God here in Psalm 48 are called on to praise and be glad because of God’s judgment. Walk about Zion, and go all around her, count her towers; mark well her bulwarks; consider her palaces; that you may tell it to the generation following. 4 For, lo, the kings were assembled, they passed by together. As Levites active in serving as musicians within the tabernacle and temple system, as gatekeepers of the temples, and as people with possibly mixed ethnic heritage (Ezrahite seems to refer to native-born or indigenous people, presumably among those who served like the Levites in the temple and tabernacle system). There are additional elements of interest in this particular psalm. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. Psalms 46, 47 and 48. William Nicholson. That might be worth considering (see v13). It is unsurprising, therefore, that the concerns of the Sons of Korah would reflect their role within the order and system of worship during the First and Second Temple periods. Walk about Zion, go round about her, number her towers, set your heart to her bulwarks, observe distinctly her palaces, that you may tell it to the generation following. I wonder whether the only Zion is the physical one, the one that occupies a specific latitude and longitude. Up to now, God has been talked about, in the third person. The beauty is clear, the sense of height seems to be clear, but how exactly the psalmist meant us to think about that height seems to be a little less clear. It would be idle dogmatically to attribute this song to any one event of Jewish history. Here is described the terror and confusion occasioned by an east wind. ( Log Out /  Let our minds be filled with good thoughts of God. Only by holy men can the Lord be fittingly praised, and they should be incessantly occupied with his worship. Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. And that Jerusalem is the joy of the whole earth, a city in which there will be no death or sorrow or crying (Revelation 21:4). In addition, Psalm 48 shares some ties with Psalm 46 [3] as a praise of God’s role as a refuge for God’s people. As we have heard, so have we seen, in the city of. There was no room for the whole of God in Paradise, there is no room for him in his law, no room for him in the heaven of angels: in the church only is there room for all his perfections, for a triune Jehovah. A Song and Psalm for the Sons of Korah. All the suggestions under this Psalm except those otherwise designated, are by our beloved friend, Rev. Psalm 48 has been a relatively popular psalm for hymns. Within my own religious tradition at least two popular hymns have been made from it, “Great Is The Lord” and “Mount Zion Stands Most Beautiful.” Interestingly enough, the online guide for hymns confuses Psalm 48 with Psalm 87 as the inspiration for John Newton Howard’s “Glorious Things of Thee Are Spoken,” falsely assuming the song to refer to Psalm 48 because of its similarities with Psalm 87 as a psalm glorifying Jerusalem [4] [5]. Its popularity seems to result from its praise of Jerusalem, which is either taken as referring to ancient Israel and the strong love of Judaism for the well-being of Jerusalem or as a praise of God’s church in a more metaphorical use of Jerusalem. But since most Christians do not bother to understand or study this context, our understanding of the importance of the work and the meaning of the works of the Sons of Korah remains very limited. Of course, simply because one faithfully records one’s experiences and one’s life and one’s time does not mean that later generations will believe such works, but at the very least one’s obligations toward future generations will be done in giving them a true and accurate record of that which we have seen and experienced as honest eyewitnesses as well as a faithful example of godly behavior for future generations to model. ; Beautifully elevated, the joy of the whole earth is Mount Zion; on the sides of the north is the city of the great king. By David’s time it seems they served in the musical aspect of the temple worship (2 Chronicles 20:19). Verse 1. The religion in it holy, the people in it a holy people. It is also worthy of a brief note that the last phrase of this psalm is under some dispute as to its meaning in the ancient texts. Additionally, this poem is a moving tribute both to God’s promise to serve as a refuge and as a bulwark to protect His people as well as a testament to God’s grace and God’s judgments, showing that God is both merciful and just, a balanced presentation of both sides of God’s dealing with mankind. ( Log Out /  Article Images Copyright © 2020 Getty Images unless otherwise indicated. Complete Concise This psalm, as the two former, is a triumphant song; some think it was penned on occasion of Jehoshaphat's victory (2 Chr. Jesus is "the great Shepherd," he is "a Saviour, and a great one," our great God and Saviour, our great High Priest; his Father has divided him a portion with the great, and his name shall be great unto the ends of the earth. Great is the Lord, and greatly to be praised in the city of our God, etc. The authority and rule of God is something that believers look forward to–while the enemies of God’s people quake and fear (Psalm 48:5-6) in the expectation of God’s wrath against them for their rebellion and disobedience. ... by following Matters of Interpretation. 4 For, lo, the kings were assembled, they passed by together. Psalm 48:1 "Great [is] the LORD, and greatly to be praised in the city of our God, [in] the mountain of his holiness." In a similar manner to the Apostle John in Revelation 21, the psalmist commands believers to take a record of the towers and palaces in Jerusalem to leave a record for generations to come of God’s great favor and blessings. You break in pieces the ships of Tarshish by an east-wind. This description is taken from those things which occur in the world of spirits, for the internal sense of the Word involves it.

Inexpensive Deck Ideas, Parliamentary Debate Topics, Is Frog Lake Open, Adjectives Worksheets For Grade 1, Royal Doulton 1815 Blue, Yuriko The Tiger's Shadow, Pioneer Woman Lemon Icebox Cake, Cabbage Side Effects, How To Dry Flowers For Tea,